Down the TBR Hole | #1


Hello everyone!

Today is a first for me! I’m finally doing the Down the TBR Hole meme. This was created by Lost in a story. Go check her blog out if you don’t know Lia already! I don’t know if I’ll do this meme every week. It depends on the posts that have to go up there because they are for blog tours or cover reveals but I’ll try to do it regularly!

So how does this meme work? It’s pretty easy!

  1. Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  2. Order on ascending date added.
  3. Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if youre feeling adventurous) books. Of course, if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  4. Read the synopses of the books
  5. Decide: keep it or should it go?

And now without further ado. Let’s do this fearful thingy of deleting books on my virtual or real TBR shelf. (And let’s hope that I won’t get the idea to continue adding books because I bloody know myself!)


Down the TBR

Currently on my shelf – 1397 

#1 – Birds of a Feather – Jacqueline Winspear – Book 2

Goodreads Synopsis

It is the spring of 1930, and Maisie has been hired to find a runaway heiress. When three of the heiress’s old friends are found dead, Maisie must race to find out who would want to kill these seemingly respectable young women before it’s too late. As Maisie investigates, she discovers that the answers lie in the unforgettable agony of the Great War.

DecisionGO! It is book two in a series I haven’t even started. So I’m sorry but it has to go!

#2 – Mr Mercedes – Stephen King – Bill Hodges Trilogy, Book 1

Goodreads Synopsis

#1 New York Times bestseller! In a high-suspense race against time, three of the most unlikely heroes Stephen King has ever created try to stop a lone killer from blowing up thousands. “Mr. Mercedes is a rich, resonant, exceptionally readable accomplishment by a man who can write in whatever genre he chooses” (The Washington Post).

In the frigid pre-dawn hours, in a distressed Midwestern city, desperate unemployed folks are lined up for a spot at a job fair. Without warning, a lone driver plows through the crowd in a stolen Mercedes, running over the innocent, backing up, and charging again. Eight people are killed; fifteen are wounded. The killer escapes.

In another part of town, months later, a retired cop named Bill Hodges is still haunted by the unsolved crime. When he gets a crazed letter from someone who self-identifies as the “perk” and threatens an even more diabolical attack, Hodges wakes up from his depressed and vacant retirement, hell-bent on preventing another tragedy.

Brady Hartsfield lives with his alcoholic mother in the house where he was born. He loved the feel of death under the wheels of the Mercedes, and he wants that rush again. Only Bill Hodges, with two new, unusual allies, can apprehend the killer before he strikes again. And they have no time to lose, because Brady’s next mission, if it succeeds, will kill or maim thousands.

Mr. Mercedes is a war between good and evil, from the master of suspense whose insight into the mind of this obsessed, insane killer is chilling and unforgettable.

DecisionKEEP! I have a love-hate relationship with Stephen King’s works but I absolutely have to try this. So it stays.

#3 – To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee – Book 1

Goodreads Synopsis

The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic.

Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior – to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into forty languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature.

DecisionGO! Even though I want to read more classics, I’m not interested in reading this one anymore!

#4 – Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen

Goodreads Synopsis

‘It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.’ Thus memorably begins Jane Austen‘s Pride and Prejudice, one of the world’s most popular novels. Pride and Prejudice–Austen’s own ‘darling child’–tells the story of fiercely independent Elizabeth Bennett, one of five sisters who must marry rich, as she confounds the arrogant, wealthy Mr. Darcy. What ensues is one of the most delightful and engrossingly readable courtships known to literature, written by a precocious Austen when she was just twenty-one years old.

Humorous and profound, and filled with highly entertaining dialogue, this witty comedy of manners dips and turns through drawing-rooms and plots to reach an immensely satisfying finale. In the words of Eudora Welty, Pride and Prejudice is as ‘irresistible and as nearly flawless as any fiction could be.’

DecisionKEEP! I really want to read some books by Jane Austen and I absolutely have to read more classics!

#5 – The Book Thief – Markus Zusak

Goodreads Synopsis

It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery …

Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist – books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau. This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to feed the soul.

Decision – KEEP! I just can’t let that book go. Set in world war II, I just have to read it!

#6 – The Black Stallion – Walter Farley – Book 1

Goodreads Synopsis

Published originally in 1941, this book is about a young boy, Alec Ramsay who finds a wild black stallion at a small Arabian port on the Red Sea. Between the black stallion and young boy, a strange understanding grew that you lead them through untold dangers as they journeyed to America. Nor could Alec understand that his adventures with the black stallion would capture the interest of an entire nation.

Decision – GO! I just have no interest at all in reading this book.

#7 – IT – Stephen King

Goodreads Synopsis

Welcome to Derry, Maine…

It’s a small city, a place as hauntingly familiar as your own hometown. Only in Derry the haunting is real…

They were seven teenagers when they first stumbled upon the horror. Now they are grown-up men and women who have gone out into the big world to gain success and happiness. But none of them can withstand the force that has drawn them back to Derry to face the nightmare without an end, and the evil without a name.

Decision – KEEP!  I’ve bought this book a few months ago and I absolutely want to read it! So it stays!

#8 – Dracula – Bram Stoker

Goodreads Synopsis

A true masterwork of storytelling, Dracula has transcended generation, language, and culture to become one of the most popular novels ever written. It is a quintessential tale of suspense and horror, boasting one of the most terrifying characters ever born in literature: Count Dracula, a tragic, night-dwelling specter who feeds upon the blood of the living, and whose diabolical passions prey upon the innocent, the helpless, and the beautiful. But Dracula also stands as a bleak allegorical saga of an eternally cursed being whose nocturnal atrocities reflect the dark underside of the supremely moralistic age in which it was originally written — and the corrupt desires that continue to plague the modern human condition.
Pocket Books Enriched Classics present the great works of world literature enhanced for the contemporary reader. This edition of Dracula was prepared by Joseph Valente, Professor of English at the University of Illinois and the author of Dracula’s Crypt: Bram Stoker, Irishness, and the Question of Blood, who provides insight into the racial connotations of this enduring masterpiece.

Decision – GO! I have absolutely no interest in reading Dracula.

#9 – Carrie – Stephen King

Goodreads Synopsis

Carrie knew she should not use the terrifying power she possessed… But one night at her senior prom, Carrie was scorned and humiliated just one time too many, and in a fit of uncontrollable fury she turned her clandestine game into a weapon of horror and destruction…

Decision – KEEP! It’s a Stephen King book, I just have to keep it on my TBR!

#10 – The Bazaar of Bad Dreams – Stephen King

Goodreads Synopsis

A master storyteller at his best—the O. Henry Prize winner Stephen King delivers a generous collection of stories, several of them brand-new, featuring revelatory autobiographical comments on when, why, and how he came to write (or rewrite) each story.

Since his first collection, Nightshift, published thirty-five years ago, Stephen King has dazzled readers with his genius as a writer of short fiction. In this new collection he assembles, for the first time, recent stories that have never been published in a book. He introduces each with a passage about its origins or his motivations for writing it.

There are thrilling connections between stories; themes of morality, the afterlife, guilt, what we would do differently if we could see into the future or correct the mistakes of the past. “Afterlife” is about a man who died of colon cancer and keeps reliving the same life, repeating his mistakes over and over again. Several stories feature characters at the end of life, revisiting their crimes and misdemeanors. Other stories address what happens when someone discovers that he has supernatural powers—the columnist who kills people by writing their obituaries in “Obits;” the old judge in “The Dune” who, as a boy, canoed to a deserted island and saw names written in the sand, the names of people who then died in freak accidents. In “Morality,” King looks at how a marriage and two lives fall apart after the wife and husband enter into what seems, at first, a devil’s pact they can win.

Magnificent, eerie, utterly compelling, these stories comprise one of King’s finest gifts to his constant reader—“I made them especially for you,” says King. “Feel free to examine them, but please be careful. The best of them have teeth.”

Decision – KEEP! See above.


Total number of books kept – 6

Total number of books that had to go – 4

The total number of books on my to-read shelf – 1393

I’m pretty satisfied with myself, to be honest. Do you participate in this meme as well? How is your TBR shelf looking? Please let me know in the comments below!


16 thoughts on “Down the TBR Hole | #1

  1. morethangeekylove says:

    Niceeee you did some clean up here.

    Just yesterday I bought myself The Book Thief and cannot wait to read it!!! The movie was amazing and I cried like a baby. I love books set in the WWI and WWII or any other historical period.

    OMG I cannot bring myself to read Stephen King… I just feel that heaviness around his books and just nopeee me gotta stay away from them xD I don;t know why. I don’t mean that I hate his works or something just that they are not for me maybe? But I want to give it a try and read a book of his.

    And yesss I am participating in this meme as well and I found it soooo USEFUL!! haha

    Liked by 1 person

    • phanniebeingginger says:

      I haven’t seen the movie but I’ve heard amazing things about the novel and the movie. So I hope that I can get my hands on a copy soon.
      If you want to read a King novel I’d recommend Under the dome, The Dead Zone or 11/22/63. Those three were my favourites by him.
      That meme is useful! LOL. You just have to have enough self-control to not add other books. (I totally failed by the way xD)

      Liked by 1 person

  2. paperbackdreamer says:

    This is a great meme, I have a feeling I’ll be participating soon because my goodreads shelf is… something else 😛

    I have heard such good things about the book thief, I really need to pick it up and see for myself 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Jessica says:

    I love “To Kill a Mockingbird” and I’m sad to see you let it go! It has a really great message that is super important! I just got “It” recently and I am hoping to pick it up soon!


    • phanniebeingginger says:

      In the past, I’ve wanted to read “To Kill a Mockingbird” but I never bought it (and I probably never will) when I was at my local bookstore even though it was at arm’s length. And today I have no interest in reading it anymore. However, this doesn’t mean that my future self will never pick it up. It could be possible that I might read it someday. But probably not in the near future.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. becandbones says:

    So many classics and Steven King books! I think I’m going to wrap this meme up on my own blog, but I found it so productive!
    I’m sad to see you get rid of To Kill a Mockingbird. It’s one of my all time favourites. But I completely understand what you mean by love-hate relationship with King. I love his short stories but find some of his lengthier novels too slow.

    Liked by 1 person

    • phanniebeingginger says:

      I have to say that the meme is really productive. Even though I can’t control myself and I have to add other books to the list. I agree Kings lengthier novels are really slow sometimes. For some of them I had my problems to get through the middle of the books but in the end, I still enjoyed most of them even though some parts were probably not necessary.

      Liked by 1 person

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